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Sister Nancy question

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SOMER


Just picked up her "One Two" LP and this new spot and was wondering how/when "Bam Bam" ended up "crossing over" into NY hip-hop circles? I'm assuming the reissue 12" came after the song had already become a minor hit?
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Big Beat put out 12"s for "Bam Bam" and Dawn Penn "No No No" at the same time...1993. The Dawn Penn is from the rocksteady and Sister Nancy from the early 80's...must have been a dancehall revival going on or they were sampled at that time in hip hop tracks? There's a Stretch Armstrong remix of "Bam Bam" on the 12" so maybe that helped it crossover. I'm just guessing here...both tracks rule of course.
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It's a thin thin line between grittysoulfulgood an


Maybe "Just Hanging Out" put it into people's minds?
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Bad brain is a terrible waste


In the fall/winter of 87 my uppercalssman buddy would blast Bam Bam, Informer in the area...murderer, and ePMDs Its My Thang while we smoked the local weed out of a bol. He was a Bronxite like me and was a Dancehall cat as well as Hip Hop.
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welcome to Harlem, where you are welcome to proble


I mean, there has always been a dancehall/hip hop crossover out here. Huge island population. Both would play at parties.

I think BDP/Just-Ice we're the first to freak it on record (not Bam-Bam per se, just reggae/hip hop styles), but Bam Bam was a reggae hit from the door I think, so it was just natural considering how closely the two styles were intertwined back then.
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welcome to Harlem, where you are welcome to proble


Also "stalag" was a hit rhythm before Sister Nancy's tune
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SOMER


Yeah, I'm curious about this song in particular. I get that dancehall was big. I want to know when *this song * got large. The "Stalag" riddim is a good point.
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welcome to Harlem, where you are welcome to proble


mannybolone - 15 October 2012 12:22 AM
Yeah, I'm curious about this song in particular. I get that dancehall was big. I want to know when *this song * got large. The "Stalag" riddim is a good point.


You have to a least put it in context of other dancehall songs that had hip-hop crossover. which is not a short list!
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Bad brain is a terrible waste


This is an interesting can of worms.

In the early 80's where the new Yankee Stadium used to be( there was a running track there that now moved to the old stadium area) the local cats would set up a soundsystem and blast the fuck outta some Reggae.
And it was Classic Bob Marley and them, Hard Dub ,and Dancehall. 81-85 type shit.
The bigger Dancehall hits did get heard in the skreets. By the late 80's Hip Hop dudes who rubbed elbows w/ West Indians or were West Indian themselves used Reggae. Think Run-DMC w/ Yellowman before Scott and them.
But I wouldnt see Rochelle and Charlene w/ Reggae in their rotations until the late 80's or even early 90's when shit really "crossed over" to the larger Black Community and then to other folks.
Bam Bam was a hit but not gettin WBLS love. I think WBAI had the Reggae shit on lock then IIRC.

Theres a deeper story to be told here. We all know the Kool Herc west Indian" they rocked turntables first" story. But the fusion could use a sharper inspection/ analysis. Shit like Kuff was huge. Red Alert would play Dancehall in those days as well during the Hip Hop sets IIRC. But not in 87. There was so much exchange that theres some stories there. Shit...Reggaeton cam outta that 90's shit.
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COURTEOUS MAYFIELD


i could speak to this personally as i was a teenaged intern at Profile records in 1994 and we had a dancehall division and Bam Bam was on several of the compilations which were heavily pushed at the time, alongside cutty ranks, super cat, shabba ranks etc.

also, you have Too Short sampling Bam Bam in prob 1992? and Lauryn Hill basically lifting the the whole melody etc for Lost Ones later in the 90's.
dancehall generally was in heavy rotation at that time, you weren't a dj in ny or philly at least unless you did a dancehall set at some point in the night. there were plenty of records to choose from and Bam Bam was just a riddim that never lost its appeal or seemed irrelevant. it kinda never died.

side note, i opened for sister nancy this summer and she KILLED IT. she was barefoot and wearing a terry cloth jumpsuit and she was serious as hell. her voice was strong and her style was alive!!! no question she still puts on a show.
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What the hell are you talking about


The song got large in 92, was re-ished in 93.

Reason being it is a non-violent song.
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SOMER


AKallDay - 15 October 2012 03:25 AM
i could speak to this personally as i was a teenaged intern at Profile records in 1994 and we had a dancehall division and Bam Bam was on several of the compilations which were heavily pushed at the time, alongside cutty ranks, super cat, shabba ranks etc.

also, you have Too Short sampling Bam Bam in prob 1992? and Lauryn Hill basically lifting the the whole melody etc for Lost Ones later in the 90's.
dancehall generally was in heavy rotation at that time, you weren't a dj in ny or philly at least unless you did a dancehall set at some point in the night. there were plenty of records to choose from and Bam Bam was just a riddim that never lost its appeal or seemed irrelevant. it kinda never died.

side note, i opened for sister nancy this summer and she KILLED IT. she was barefoot and wearing a terry cloth jumpsuit and she was serious as hell. her voice was strong and her style was alive!!! no question she still puts on a show.


Fascinating. Thank you for sharing this.

I'm also wondering if Sister Nancy was part of a "ladies first"-kind of moment in dancehall in the early '80s? In particular, I'm not only struck by her line on "Bam Bam" - "I'm a lady and not a man" ??? but more so by the LP's other song, "Only Woman DJ With Degree" which is a really fascinating boast since it seems to wrap up both gender and class.
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deep inna majestic segue


that lick of the stalag riddim, fire on a sound
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Dancehall and hip hop sat side by side in London since the mid eighties. As far as I can recall, Asher D & Daddy Freddy got the ball rolling on wax with Raggamuffin Hip Hop in 87, but first time I heard Bam Bam was on Sindecut's 'Can't Get Enough (Of Who?)' in 88. I remember there was a lot of talk of how ragga hip hop (as we called it) was the authentic London sound, even though most London hip hop fans had no Jamaican heritage whatsoever!
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What the hell are you talking about


Interesting historical topic.

Tracing the roots of reggae soul hiphop leads to Johnny Nash in 65-66 an the LP "I Can See Clearly Now" on ABC (if I remember correctly). There was a crossover there. Then reggae/ska/soul/blues mingled, like in Texas on the label Federal, until 82 when pop artist Diana Ross released the crossover "I Am Me" single on RCA. By this time, hiphop an dancehall were co-evolving. Then stress caused another crossover in '92.
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GatorToof - 15 October 2012 03:04 PM
Interesting historical topic.

Tracing the roots of reggae soul hiphop leads to Johnny Nash in 65-66 an the LP "I Can See Clearly Now" on ABC (if I remember correctly). There was a crossover there. Then reggae/ska/soul/blues mingled, like in Texas on the label Federal, until 82 when pop artist Diana Ross released the crossover "I Am Me" single on RCA. By this time, hiphop an dancehall were co-evolving. Then stress caused another crossover in '92.


Wait, so Diana Ross (the pop artist) was the first to crossover between hiphop and dancehall?
Johnny Nash started this whole reggae-ska-soul-blues crossover?

I can see clearly now.
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What the hell are you talking about


leon - 15 October 2012 03:12 PM
]

Wait, so Diana Ross (the pop artist) was the first to crossover between hiphop and dancehall?
Johnny Nash started this whole reggae-ska-soul-blues crossover?

I can see clearly now.


Yeah, Johnny (65), then Diana (82), then Ini kamozee, shabba, Isis, et al (93)
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touching es lo mío


Did Sister Nancy ever have any other ambitions after becoming an emcee?
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chicago


The-gaffler - 15 October 2012 07:28 PM
Did Sister Nancy ever have any other ambitions after becoming an emcee?

I believe she also stated an ambition for transport connection.

Back in college I was trying to talk to this girl at this thing where "Bam Bam" was playing, and just as our conversation was taking a turn towards the grown, the dj mixed into JC Lodge's "Telephone Love." I felt like I was in a movie.
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Portland Oregon


leon - 15 October 2012 03:12 PM
GatorToof - 15 October 2012 03:04 PM
Interesting historical topic.

Tracing the roots of reggae soul hiphop leads to Johnny Nash in 65-66 an the LP "I Can See Clearly Now" on ABC (if I remember correctly). There was a crossover there. Then reggae/ska/soul/blues mingled, like in Texas on the label Federal, until 82 when pop artist Diana Ross released the crossover "I Am Me" single on RCA. By this time, hiphop an dancehall were co-evolving. Then stress caused another crossover in '92.


Wait, so Diana Ross (the pop artist) was the first to crossover between hiphop and dancehall?
Johnny Nash started this whole reggae-ska-soul-blues crossover?

I can see clearly now.


Meet Gatortoof.
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LaserWolf - 15 October 2012 08:06 PM
leon - 15 October 2012 03:12 PM
GatorToof - 15 October 2012 03:04 PM
Interesting historical topic.

Tracing the roots of reggae soul hiphop leads to Johnny Nash in 65-66 an the LP "I Can See Clearly Now" on ABC (if I remember correctly). There was a crossover there. Then reggae/ska/soul/blues mingled, like in Texas on the label Federal, until 82 when pop artist Diana Ross released the crossover "I Am Me" single on RCA. By this time, hiphop an dancehall were co-evolving. Then stress caused another crossover in '92.


Wait, so Diana Ross (the pop artist) was the first to crossover between hiphop and dancehall?
Johnny Nash started this whole reggae-ska-soul-blues crossover?

I can see clearly now.


Meet Gatortoof.


Yeah, can't believe i actually took the bait.

Continue.
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COURTEOUS MAYFIELD


The-gaffler - 15 October 2012 07:28 PM
Did Sister Nancy ever have any other ambitions after becoming an emcee?


M***, she is a very successful accountant and she lives in North Jerz. I'm telling you dude she is a serious lady. Also her name isn't even Nancy, it's a really carribbean name like Odelphia or something.

Hi Gator Toof you should do as the Jamaicans say and EASE BACK. You seem like a nice guy, but you needn't reply to every single thread. Especially when you don't know what you are talking about very much so much there a lot and stuff.
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ME BEIN WACK IS LIKE NAPS ON KOJAK


AKallDay - 15 October 2012 03:25 AM


side note, i opened for sister nancy this summer and she KILLED IT. she was barefoot and wearing a terry cloth jumpsuit and she was serious as hell. her voice was strong and her style was alive!!! no question she still puts on a show.

I now want a terry cloth jumpsuit. It's my ambition.
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Bad brain is a terrible waste


The_Non - 15 October 2012 08:59 PM
AKallDay - 15 October 2012 03:25 AM


side note, i opened for sister nancy this summer and she KILLED IT. she was barefoot and wearing a terry cloth jumpsuit and she was serious as hell. her voice was strong and her style was alive!!! no question she still puts on a show.

I now want a terry cloth jumpsuit. It's my ambition.


J.Lo or Baby Phat circa 2005.
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ME BEIN WACK IS LIKE NAPS ON KOJAK


batmon - 15 October 2012 09:01 PM
The_Non - 15 October 2012 08:59 PM
AKallDay - 15 October 2012 03:25 AM


side note, i opened for sister nancy this summer and she KILLED IT. she was barefoot and wearing a terry cloth jumpsuit and she was serious as hell. her voice was strong and her style was alive!!! no question she still puts on a show.

I now want a terry cloth jumpsuit. It's my ambition.


J.Lo or Baby Phat circa 2005.

OK, a MANLY terry cloth jumpsuit necessary
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Boston


What is it about Jamaican singers that their voices hold up so well? Of the dudes i've seen recently, Barrington still sounds EXACTLY like he does on those records live today, Johnny Osbourne too. Strong vocal chords from voicing so many tunes and doing so many specials? I don't know
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Boston


The_Non - 15 October 2012 09:09 PM
batmon - 15 October 2012 09:01 PM
The_Non - 15 October 2012 08:59 PM
AKallDay - 15 October 2012 03:25 AM


side note, i opened for sister nancy this summer and she KILLED IT. she was barefoot and wearing a terry cloth jumpsuit and she was serious as hell. her voice was strong and her style was alive!!! no question she still puts on a show.

I now want a terry cloth jumpsuit. It's my ambition.


J.Lo or Baby Phat circa 2005.

OK, a MANLY terry cloth jumpsuit necessary


I have an all canary yellow joint that's pretty killer
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amphibious - 15 October 2012 09:23 PM
What is it about Jamaican singers that their voices hold up so well? Of the dudes i've seen recently, Barrington still sounds EXACTLY like he does on those records live today, Johnny Osbourne too. Strong vocal chords from voicing so many tunes and doing so many specials? I don't know



co-sign Johnny Osbourne & Barrington...Also Beres Hammond, Marcia Griffiths still got it.
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Two Ron Toe


I'm going by memory here. But pcmr posted a link to a ebook called "Roots of Dancehall".

I only skimmed through it. But I thought there was some decent parts dealing with Sister Nancy. It seemed like it would be a good read all around.
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errant movement


DOR - 15 October 2012 10:37 PM
I'm going by memory here. But pcmr posted a link to a ebook called "Roots of Dancehall".

I only skimmed through it. But I thought there was some decent parts dealing with Sister Nancy. It seemed like it would be a good read all around.


It's Beth Lesser's new book. She's a Toronto resident along with David Kingston, her husband. They used to run Reggae Quarterly magazine for a minute and he had one of the city's best reggae radio shows - Reggae Showcase - on CKLN.
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Sold a lot of records and grabbed somethin'.


Jonny_Paycheck - 14 October 2012 11:45 PM
Also "stalag" was a hit rhythm before Sister Nancy's tune


In my privater Kopfgarten, you actually wrote, "Stalag was a popular riddim, and it still is."

mannybolone - 15 October 2012 05:54 AM
I'm also wondering if Sister Nancy was part of a "ladies first"-kind of moment in dancehall in the early '80s? In particular, I'm not only struck by her line on "Bam Bam" - "I'm a lady and not a man" ??? but more so by the LP's other song, "Only Woman DJ With Degree" which is a really fascinating boast since it seems to wrap up both gender and class.


I'm not sure if this is at all relevant to your line of questioning, but Nancy is the younger sister of Brigadier Jerry (of the unfadeable "Jamaica, Jamaica" cut). I always found it interesting that her very stage name was sort of a reference to her older brother. He got to be a brigadier, while she was relegated to "Sister." Maybe I'm reading too much into that.

Side note: someone gave our daughter a baby doll when she was two. I named her "Nancy" as in "Sister Nancy" and it stuck.

james - 15 October 2012 07:40 PM

Back in college I was trying to talk to this girl at this thing where "Bam Bam" was playing, and just as our conversation was taking a turn towards the grown, the dj mixed into JC Lodge's "Telephone Love." I felt like I was in a movie.


One AM, DJ made it a rub....
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